Let’s Talk About…The Plague

The holidays celebrate material plenty. But that can be a tough sell these days.

We mostly take our plenty for granted. We don’t even know its absence. This is especially true regarding food. Global hunger has fallen to historic lows — down 27% just since 2000. Fully 17 countries have improved by 50%. Famine has been effectively ended in normal times, and the few cases that remain are due not to a lack of production but to war.

The situation in the developed world is incredible: poverty and hunger at historic lows, mostly nonexistent in most people’s life experience. Even a full Thanksgiving dinner only costs about 2 hours and 22 minutes of work. Indeed, the “problem” is the opposite. An estimated 45 million people are trying hard to eat less and spend $33 billion annually on products to help them do so.

To fully appreciate the material blessing of the holidays — access to food and good health care and the absence of widespread material privation and death — you have to throw yourself back in time.

Consider the plague. It would strike randomly, wipe out your family, your neighbors, and you. The suffering was unimaginable. It didn’t discriminate by class or wealth. A third of Europe died of the plague in the middle ages, and the plague affected the ancient world too.

It was wicked, and all the more so because the cause and therefore the solution were unknown. It seemed like a curse from the gods. And it profoundly affected the culture. Why save and invest? Why plan for the future at all? Burial rituals gave way to mass burnings. Loved ones dared not stay by the sick. Morals evaporated. Survival was the only rule. Generations would have to go by before people’s mindsets recovered from such a nightmare.

The classic account of the plague comes from Thucydides (460-400 BC), the Athenian historian and moralist. His tale could apply to any plague for the following 2,000 years until the advent of capitalism gave rise to modern sanitation and medical science. Finally humanity was free of this disaster.

Prepare yourself:

The Plague of Athens
by Thucydides

In the first days of summer the Spartans and their allies, with two-thirds of their forces as before, invaded Attica, under the command of Archidamus, son of Zeuxidamus, king of Sparta, and sat down and laid waste the country.

Not many days after their arrival in Attica the plague first began to show itself among the Athenians. It was said that it had broken out in many places previously in the neighborhood of Lemnos and elsewhere; but a pestilence of such extent and mortality was nowhere remembered. Neither were the physicians at first of any service, ignorant as they were of the proper way to treat it, but they died themselves the most thickly, as they visited the sick most often; nor did any human art succeed any better. Supplications in the temples, divinations, and so forth were found equally futile, till the overwhelming nature of the disaster at last put a stop to them altogether.

It first began, it is said, in the parts of Ethiopia above Egypt, and thence descended into Egypt and Libya and into most of the [Persian] King’s country. Suddenly falling upon Athens, it first attacked the population in Piraeus — which was the occasion of their saying that the Peloponnesians had poisoned the reservoirs, there being as yet no wells there — and afterwards appeared in the upper city, when the deaths became much more frequent.

All speculation as to its origin and its causes, if causes can be found adequate to produce so great a disturbance, I leave to other writers, whether lay or professional; for myself, I shall simply set down its nature, and explain the symptoms by which perhaps it may be recognized by the student, if it should ever break out again. This I can the better do, as I had the disease myself, and watched its operation in the case of others.

That year then is admitted to have been otherwise unprecedentedly free from sickness; and such few cases as occurred all determined in this. As a rule, however, there was no ostensible cause; but people in good health were all of a sudden attacked by violent heats in the head, and redness and inflammation in the eyes, the inward parts, such as the throat or tongue, becoming bloody and emitting an unnatural and fetid breath.

These symptoms were followed by sneezing and hoarseness, after which the pain soon reached the chest, and produced a hard cough. When it fixed in the stomach, it upset it; and discharges of bile of every kind named by physicians ensued, accompanied by very great distress. In most cases also an ineffectual retching followed, producing violent spasms, which in some cases ceased soon after, in others much later.

Externally the body was not very hot to the touch, nor pale in its appearance, but reddish, livid, and breaking out into small pustules and ulcers. But internally it burned so that the patient could not bear to have on him clothing or linen even of the very lightest description; or indeed to be otherwise than stark naked. What they would have liked best would have been to throw themselves into cold water; as indeed was done by some of the neglected sick, who plunged into the rain tanks in their agonies of unquenchable thirst; though it made no difference whether they drank little or much.

Besides this, the miserable feeling of not being able to rest or sleep never ceased to torment them. The body meanwhile did not waste away so long as the distemper was at its height, but held out to a marvel against its ravages; so that when they succumbed, as in most cases, on the seventh or eighth day to the internal inflammation, they had still some strength in them. But if they passed this stage, and the disease descended further into the bowels, inducing a violent ulceration there accompanied by severe diarrhea, this brought on a weakness which was generally fatal.

For the disorder first settled in the head, ran its course from thence through the whole of the body, and, even where it did not prove mortal, it still left its mark on the extremities; for it settled in the privy parts, the fingers and the toes, and many escaped with the loss of these, some too with that of their eyes. Others again were seized with an entire loss of memory on their first recovery, and did not know either themselves or their friends.

But while the nature of the distemper was such as to baffle all description, and its attacks almost too grievous for human nature to endure, it was still in the following circumstance that its difference from all ordinary disorders was most clearly shown. All the birds and beasts that prey upon human bodies, either abstained from touching them (though there were many lying unburied), or died after tasting them.

In proof of this, it was noticed that birds of this kind actually disappeared; they were not about the bodies, or indeed to be seen at all. But of course the effects which I have mentioned could best be studied in a domestic animal like the dog.

Such then, if we pass over the varieties of particular cases which were many and peculiar, were the general features of the distemper. Meanwhile the town enjoyed an immunity from all the ordinary disorders; or if any case occurred, it ended in this. Some died in neglect, others in the midst of every attention. No remedy was found that could be used as a specific; for what did good in one case, did harm in another.

Strong and weak constitutions proved equally incapable of resistance, all alike being swept away, although dieted with the utmost precaution.

By far the most terrible feature in the malady was the dejection which ensued when any one felt himself sickening, for the despair into which they instantly fell took away their power of resistance, and left them a much easier prey to the disorder; besides which, there was the awful spectacle of men dying like sheep, through having caught the infection in nursing each other.

This caused the greatest mortality. On the one hand, if they were afraid to visit each other, they perished from neglect; indeed many houses were emptied of their inmates for want of a nurse: on the other, if they ventured to do so, death was the consequence.

This was especially the case with such as made any pretensions to goodness: honor made them unsparing of themselves in their attendance in their friends’ houses, where even the members of the family were at last worn out by the moans of the dying, and succumbed to the force of the disaster.

Yet it was with those who had recovered from the disease that the sick and the dying found most compassion. These knew what it was from experience, and had now no fear for themselves; for the same man was never attacked twice — never at least fatally. And such persons not only received the congratulations of others, but themselves also, in the elation of the moment, half entertained the vain hope that they were for the future safe from any disease whatsoever.

An aggravation of the existing calamity was the influx from the country into the city, and this was especially felt by the new arrivals. As there were no houses to receive them, they had to be lodged at the hot season of the year in stifling cabins, where the mortality raged without restraint. The bodies of dying men lay one upon another, and half-dead creatures reeled about the streets and gathered round all the fountains in their longing for water. The sacred places also in which they had quartered themselves were full of corpses of persons that had died there, just as they were; for as the disaster passed all bounds, men, not knowing what was to become of them, became utterly careless of everything, whether sacred or profane.

All the burial rites before in use were entirely upset, and they buried the bodies as best they could. Many from want of the proper appliances, through so many of their friends having died already, had recourse to the most shameless sepultures: sometimes getting the start of those who had raised a pile, they threw their own dead body upon the stranger’s pyre and ignited it; sometimes they tossed the corpse which they were carrying on the top of another that was burning, and so went off.

Nor was this the only form of lawless extravagance which owed its origin to the plague. Men now coolly ventured on what they had formerly done in a corner, and not just as they pleased, seeing the rapid transitions produced by persons in prosperity suddenly dying and those who before had nothing succeeding to their property. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day. Perseverance in what men called honor was popular with none, it was so uncertain whether they would be spared to attain the object; but it was settled that present enjoyment, and all that contributed to it, was both honorable and useful.

Fear of gods or law of man there was none to restrain them. As for the first, they judged it to be just the same whether they worshipped them or not, as they saw all alike perishing; and for the last, no one expected to live to be brought to trial for his offenses, but each felt that a far severer sentence had been already passed upon them all and hung ever over their heads, and before this fell it was only reasonable to enjoy life a little.

Such was the nature of the calamity, and heavily did it weigh on the Athenians; death raging within the city and devastation without….

(The translation of Thucydides 2.47.1-55.1 was made by Richard Crawley.)

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Jeffrey A. Tucker

Jeffrey A. Tucker is Founder and President of the Brownstone Institute. He is also Senior Economics Columnist for Epoch Times, author of 10 books, including Liberty or Lockdown, and thousands of articles in the scholarly and popular press. He speaks widely on topics of economics, technology, social philosophy, and culture.

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22 comments

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  • Good Lord. Nothing like a good account of the plague to remind you of what you have to be thankful for. Like not having the plague.

  • Good Lord. Nothing like a good account of the plague to remind you of what you have to be thankful for. Like not having the plague.

  • Good Lord. Nothing like a good account of the plague to remind you of what you have to be thankful for. Like not having the plague.

  • Good Lord. Nothing like a good account of the plague to remind you of what you have to be thankful for. Like not having the plague.

  • Oh my Mr. Tucker….a sobering way to wake up this morning. I’m thankful, I promise, the plague is behind us. I can hardly wait for something uplifting, like a SNL skit of Trump and Hillary’s first date.

  • Oh my Mr. Tucker….a sobering way to wake up this morning. I’m thankful, I promise, the plague is behind us. I can hardly wait for something uplifting, like a SNL skit of Trump and Hillary’s first date.

  • Oh my Mr. Tucker….a sobering way to wake up this morning. I’m thankful, I promise, the plague is behind us. I can hardly wait for something uplifting, like a SNL skit of Trump and Hillary’s first date.

  • Oh my Mr. Tucker….a sobering way to wake up this morning. I’m thankful, I promise, the plague is behind us. I can hardly wait for something uplifting, like a SNL skit of Trump and Hillary’s first date.

  • The Plague of the Dark Ages of Economics

    Humans are subjective and this cannot be empiricized which means that the State cannot reduce humans to data to be classified and then categorized; divided and conquered. Educated humans will slough off the dehumanizing and perverse limitations of the statist ideology. It is time to cure this plague of the Dark Ages of economics.

  • The Plague of the Dark Ages of Economics

    Humans are subjective and this cannot be empiricized which means that the State cannot reduce humans to data to be classified and then categorized; divided and conquered. Educated humans will slough off the dehumanizing and perverse limitations of the statist ideology. It is time to cure this plague of the Dark Ages of economics.

  • How little we appreciate what capitalism has brought us. It is hard to imagine that only two centuries ago dental abscesses were a leading cause of death!

  • How little we appreciate what capitalism has brought us. It is hard to imagine that only two centuries ago dental abscesses were a leading cause of death!

  • How little we appreciate what capitalism has brought us. It is hard to imagine that only two centuries ago dental abscesses were a leading cause of death!

  • How little we appreciate what capitalism has brought us. It is hard to imagine that only two centuries ago dental abscesses were a leading cause of death!

  • “Men now coolly ventured on what they had formerly done in a corner, and not just as they pleased, seeing the rapid transitions produced by persons in prosperity suddenly dying and those who before had nothing succeeding to their property. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day. Perseverance in what men called honor was popular with none, it was so uncertain whether they would be spared to attain the object; but it was settled that present enjoyment, and all that contributed to it, was both honorable and useful.”

    The Plague favors the ascendancy of high time preference behavior.

  • “Men now coolly ventured on what they had formerly done in a corner, and not just as they pleased, seeing the rapid transitions produced by persons in prosperity suddenly dying and those who before had nothing succeeding to their property. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day. Perseverance in what men called honor was popular with none, it was so uncertain whether they would be spared to attain the object; but it was settled that present enjoyment, and all that contributed to it, was both honorable and useful.”

    The Plague favors the ascendancy of high time preference behavior.

  • “Men now coolly ventured on what they had formerly done in a corner, and not just as they pleased, seeing the rapid transitions produced by persons in prosperity suddenly dying and those who before had nothing succeeding to their property. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day. Perseverance in what men called honor was popular with none, it was so uncertain whether they would be spared to attain the object; but it was settled that present enjoyment, and all that contributed to it, was both honorable and useful.”

    The Plague favors the ascendancy of high time preference behavior.

  • “Men now coolly ventured on what they had formerly done in a corner, and not just as they pleased, seeing the rapid transitions produced by persons in prosperity suddenly dying and those who before had nothing succeeding to their property. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day. Perseverance in what men called honor was popular with none, it was so uncertain whether they would be spared to attain the object; but it was settled that present enjoyment, and all that contributed to it, was both honorable and useful.”

    The Plague favors the ascendancy of high time preference behavior.

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